Florida, Kentucky judges block those US states from enforcing abortion bans


WASHINGTON (REUTERS) – Judges in Florida and Kentucky on Thursday (June 30) moved to block those states from enforcing bans or restrictions on abortion after the US Supreme Court last week overturned the 1973 Roe versus Wade decision that had established a nationwide right to it.

In Tallahassee, Florida, Circuit Court Judge John Cooper said he would grant a petition from abortion rights groups to temporarily put on hold a state law that would bar abortions after the 15th week of pregnancy.

In Kentucky, Jefferson County Circuit Judge Mitch Perry issued a temporary restraining order preventing the state from enforcing a ban passed in 2019 and triggered by the Supreme Court’s decision.

Also on Thursday, the high court threw out lower federal court rulings that had invalidated abortion limits in Arizona, Arkansas and Indiana based on Roe.

The Florida and Kentucky decisions came amid a flurry of litigation by abortion rights groups seeking to preserve the ability of women to terminate pregnancies after Friday’s historic ruling by the conservative-majority Supreme Court.

That ruling gave states the authority to deny, limit or allow abortions.

Bans and restrictions are now taking effect or are poised to do so in 22 states, including 13 like Kentucky with so-called “trigger” laws designed to take effect if Roe versus Wade was overturned, according to the Guttmacher Institute, an abortion rights advocacy research group.

State courts in Texas, Louisiana and Utah have also temporarily blocked bans in those states since last week, and abortion providers are seeking similar relief in states including Idaho, Ohio, Mississippi and West Virginia.

The injunctions have bought clinics time to continue providing services.

“Delay is still saving lives,” said Seema Mohapatra, a professor of health law at Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

“The longer safe and accessible abortion is available in those states, the more pregnant people seeking abortion care will be helped.”

In the long term, however, abortion rights supporters face tough odds. The highest courts in many of those states are dominated by conservative or Republican justices who may be more sympathetic to restrictions on abortion access.

Florida’s ban to be put on hold

Florida’s 15-week ban, which Republican Governor Ron DeSantis signed into law in April, had been set to take effect on Friday. The law mirrors the Mississippi law at the heart of the Supreme Court case that reversed Roe.

In siding with Planned Parenthood affiliates and other abortion providers in Florida, Cooper concluded the law violates the state constitution’s privacy rights guarantees, which the state’s high court has said covers the right to abortion.

State law had previously restricted abortions after 24 weeks.

Cooper said his decision would only take effect after he signs a written order, which is not likely until Tuesday or later.



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